You would have to be of a different temperament than my own to be able to read it straight through in a month. Oxford University Press; Reprint edition (October 1, 2011), From a Monarchical to a Republican Way of Government, Reviewed in the United States on May 3, 2016. Half of the book is organized chronologically and the other half by topic. The author, Dr. Gordon S. Wood is a respected historian and professor who is a very acomplished writer of early American history and this is no exception. by Oxford University Press. Gordon Wood draws the reader into the story of how the United States went from being nothing more than a rebellious former colony of Great Britain to that of a nation in its own right, ready to compete with the Old World monarchies in the big wide world. Even though it seems like a daunting task to pick it up and read it, Mr. Wood's writing is extraordinary and moves the story along swiftly. the economic and political stability of Federalism vs. populist anarchy of Jeffersonian. You may drag your family to every single historical site you can find (especially in lieu of other, more fun spots....'what Great America? For me, this book provoked a lot of re-thinking about the nature of the American Revolution. Personally I don’t like when authors hint things like “the second war of independence” without explaining it. That's a minor quibble, though, and it does serve to reinforce the difference between the Jeffersonian/Madisonian view (government is not the primary driver of events) from the Hamiltonian view that preceded it. I would have preferred a chapter explaining financial operations during this period, than the chapter that was spent on religion. He… In order to navigate out of this carousel please use your heading shortcut key to navigate to the next or previous heading. He also keeps the them that the republic actually created by the Revolution and Constitutional Convention was nothing at all what the founding fathers intended. Woods exemplary analysis into the politics and culture of the beginning of America is, in a most welcome way, reassuring: the partisanship, the rhetoric, the heated debates on the roll of government taking place in the Founding generation are all so applicable to todays political climate that it is almost unsettling. I thoroughly enjoyed this read. If, like me, your understanding of US history between the Constitutional Convention and the War of 1812 is "something something XYZ affair something" then this will get you caught right up. I have heard a lot of good things about Wood's historical perspective and this period of American history is one that I am only familiar with in its broad outlines. At the outset of his history of the United States between 1789 - 1815, Professor Gordon Wood aptly describes his subject as "Rip Van Winkle's America". Being addicted to history can in fact create trouble. Now, in the newest volume in the series, one of America's most esteemed historians, Gordon S. Wood, offers a brilliant account of the early American Republic, ranging from 1789 and the beginning of the national government to the end of the War of 1812. L'oeuvre de Gordon Wood, le meilleur historien des Etats-Unis, est indispensable pour comprendre que ce pays s'est bâti sur un débat politique au sein des pères fondateurs: soit l'on construit une république vertueuse (c'est le rejet de la corruption de l'Angleterre après la crise financière de 1720 qui a été la cause profonde de la Révolution américaine), ce qui implique de rester dans le modèle de la république rurale, soit on accepte le modèle anglais de développement industriel et commercial, mais au prix de la corruption (au sens de Machiavel) des institutions. The book’s focus on Jefferson and the Republican ideas keeps the Federalists anglophiles in the background, leaving with it the largely unexplained British-American relationship after independence. A thorough and deep analysis; a requisite part of the library of any serious historian. At 738 pages (paperback)this is a balanced to "center-left" history book, which is a little different than what I am used to but it was well done. Gordon Wood has been working on this book for over 20 years and it shows. It also analyzes reviews to verify trustworthiness. He is definitely a pro-Jeffersonian Republican who were opposed to the. He is a recipient of the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for History for The Radicalism of the American Revolution (1992). I like learning about how society as a whole changes over time and adapts to the changing political landscape but the focus on perspectives through the various demographics was a little over-emphasized/long winded. Please try your request again later. Previously, i had thought of it less as a revolution, and more in the Jacques Barzun formulation, as a continuation of the evolutionary politics of Whiggish Britain. How can an "empire", with its connotation of control by an "emperor" at the top and “liberty” with its suggestion of freedoms enjoyed by individuals at the bottom co-exist? The Oxford History of the United States is by far the most respected multi-volume history of our nation. EMPIRE OF LIBERTY: A HISTORY OF EARLY REPUBLIC (ISBN: 9780195039146) By Gordon S. Wood - Hardcover *Excellent Condition*. At one point, trying to change my luck with the coeds, I decided to pursue the hipster lifestyle. I'm not entirely sure Barzun was wrong, but Wood makes an excellent case for the radicalism of the Founding, particularly after Jefferson and the Republicans ascended in 1800. As with every superb entry in the Oxford US History series, as well as every superb book from Gordon Wood, this one is likely to remain the benchmark for this era for years to come. Excellent overview of the culture and times of the early Republic. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Empire of Liberty: A … Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789-1815 (Oxford History of the United States Book 4) - Kindle edition by Wood, Gordon S.. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Not just wars and politics, but economics, commerce, religion, education, family life, social changes, slavery, diplomacy, westward expansion, science, philosophy, its all in there. Start by marking “Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789-1815” as Want to Read: Error rating book. Much like the other Wood book I. Empire Of Liberty: A History Of The Early Republic, 1789 1815. by Wood, Gordon S. Offers an account of the early years of the United States as a nation, including politics, law, culture, and the economy. I skimmed the sections on religion and art influences, but some chapters especially the one on slavery and those that highlighted the specifics about the founders are extremly fascinating. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. How did that happen? Now, in the newest volume in the series, one of America's most esteemed historians, Gordon S. Wood, offers a brilliant account of the early American Republic, ranging from 1789 and the beginning of the national government to the end of the War of 1812. I have enjoyed the enlightening process. How can an "empire", with its connotation of control by an "emperor" at the top and liberty with its suggestion of freedoms enjoyed by individuals at the bottom co-exist? This a difficult book to read, largely because it's comprehensive and detailed coverage. The precarious compromises wrought during the Constitutional Convention of 1787 set the stage for this epic chronicle of the early republic by a Pulitzer Prize–winning historian. There are fault lines that develop in these years as divisive and troublesome today as they were then. In addition this book spends a lot of time on "social history" such as the status of minorities and "the little people". So many history books are just summations of political and military events between two fixed dates. And that it endures - changed in innumerable ways, of course, but still, in many ways, the same – is reason to celebrate. Wow. No such luck. But more than any other single volume I have read on American history, Professor Wood takes us on an illuminating tour of issues like the slow death of the Federalist party as the Jeffersonian philosophy took hold, the development of our religious character (or lack of), the issue of Native Americans and the government's policy toward them, the development of Americanism in the arts, sciences and letters, how we eventually stopped trying to emulate British, French and general European traditions and attitudes in favor of developing our American Way (especially after the War of 1812), family and social issues, racial issues and, of course, slavery and the impact it had on our social and political life. As you can see, I have been at this book for over six years. The last issue is where he closes his book...with its mention as the one thing that kept America's promise from being completely fulfilled and setting us up for the next great volume in the Oxford series, "What Hath God Wrought." Wood, a veteran historian on the American Revolution, spends a lot of time demarcating the differences between Federalist and. The Empire of Liberty is a theme developed first by Thomas Jefferson to identify the responsibility of the United States to spread freedom across the world. Unable to add item to List. They emerge in nineteen chapters which interweave discussions about individuals (Washington, Jefferson. Please try again. Even though the author was slightly biased towards Republicanism and very biased towards Jefferson vs the Federalist founding fathers (all you need to do is compare the adjectives he uses for Jefferson vs Washington, Adams or Hamilton), I felt that he did an excellent job of comparing the positive and negative aspects of the two dominant politcal ideologies of the era (e.g. This book is the capstone of Gordon S. Wood's long career, and an outstanding addition to the Oxford History of the United States. For. Instead, our system considers things like how recent a review is and if the reviewer bought the item on Amazon. I graduated magna cum laude in one, and failed brilliantly in the other. What I've learned so far: Before I begin I would like to point out that I actually had the opportunity to meet Professor Wood when he was giving a lecture at the University of New England in September 2010. For me, this book provoked a lot of re-thinking about the nature of the American Revolution. Jules Alexandre Théophraste de Corvée de Ch...., dit "Dupond", Plus que de l'histoire, un livre de philosophie politique. I prefer, though, a more optimistic view: that this debate – on the roll of government, of economics, of democracy – is really part of the genetic makeup of our country. If, like me, your understanding of US history between the Constitutional Convention and the War of 1812 is "something something XYZ affair something" then this will get you caught right up. My personal takeaways are mostly about how tenuous the early republic was: all worried about a return to monarchy, reabsorption by England (or some other power), or just falling apart into pieces altogether. But well worth it. Gordon Stewart Wood (born November 27, 1933) is an American historian and university professor at Brown University. Much is covered, from the putting togetherbof s new government, to the roles of blacks and women in said government. At 700 pages plus, with an awkward trim size that made it difficult to tote around with me, nevermind hold in my hands, this book was a challenge, though one that I am glad I undertook. I intend to read several of the other books in this series and I can only hope that they're as good as this one. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. This is a book that explains in detail the change from the monarchy to the republican way of government. Way University Professor Emeritus at Brown University and the author of Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789-1815. So I can definitly put this one down as my "accomplishment" book of the year. Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 3, 2017. Excellent overview of the culture and times of the early Republic. I am not a fan of the way the book was structured. The Louisiana Purchase, the act that double the size of the country and opened up the Mississippi’s commercial highway, was gloss over rather quickly. I would say that coverage of the 1790s take about 75% of the Empire of Liberty. It is a work of incredible scope and scholarship. Please try again. Empire of Liberty A History of the Early Republic, 1789-1815 Gordon S. Wood Oxford History of the United States. I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of, Published Prime members enjoy FREE Delivery and exclusive access to music, movies, TV shows, original audio series, and Kindle books. As Wood reveals, the period was marked by tumultuous change in all aspects of American life--in politics, society, economy, and culture. Bring your club to Amazon Book Clubs, start a new book club and invite your friends to join, or find a club that’s right for you for free. A multi-faceted and comprehensive history of the early US republic, Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 20, 2020. Major exponents of the theme have been Abraham Lincoln (in the Gettysburg Address), Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson (and "Wilsonianism"), Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry Truman, Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, and Georg… Machiavellian Moment: Florentine Political Thought and the Atlantic Republican Tradition, , capital mais totalement ignoré de ce côté ci de l'atlantique. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. à un prix élevé (l'intro de Spitz est un livre en soi qui vaut le coup). To calculate the overall star rating and percentage breakdown by star, we don’t use a simple average. Back when I was in college, I majored in finance and minored in girls. Something went wrong. Revolutionary Period (1775-1800), 19th Century, History & Theory. Headquarters: 49 W. 45th Street 2nd Floor New York, NY 10036 Our Collection: 170 Central Park West New York, NY 10024 Located on the lower level of the New-York Historical Society Gordon S. Wood - Empire Of Liberty Tuesday, November 10, 2009 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm The latest volume in Oxford’s History of the United States series chronicles the first 25 years of the American republic, between the start of national government in 1789 and the War of 1812. JEFFREY BROWN: This sense of change and transformation as a … ), In 1789 the United States started what amounted to a national reboot, as a new republic created by the ratification of the Constitution began operation. Every paragraph has a point. Took me long enough to get through this 750 page epic. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. "Empire of Liberty will rightly take its place among the authoritative volumes in this important and influential series." Refresh and try again. Was the War of 1812 a second war of independence? No? Well maybe that's too much. The Louisiana Purchase and the war of 1812, art and culture, knowledge and education. I mean, I guess on the one hand it might be taken to illustrate how ignorant of their history that. Then this book will truly shock you. The men who founded the new government had high hopes for the future, but few of their hopes and dreams worked out quite as they expected. They emerge in nineteen chapters which interweave discussions about individuals (Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Marshall, Hamilton, Burr,to mention just a few), foreign relations (chiefly with France and Britain), subjects (law, the west, slavery, religion, political parties. After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in. ), After a second read-through, Gordon S. Wood's Empire of Liberty remains my favorite volume in the Oxford History of the United States. Wood has done a brilliant job revealing that American culture was truly born out of the revolution. (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. But well worth it. That the Federalists and Democratic-Republicans despised each other so much that it makes the political parties of today look like a love-fest? Excellent. I would compare it to a textbook really--as its extremly well organized and researched look on the United States post-Revolutionary War, something I really didnt know much about. In this volume, an Oxford History that fills a gap between the Revolutionary period and the early industrial years, Gordon Wood provides us with a multifaceted story. Indeed, the latter provides the book's main draw, showing how American visions of liberty transmogrified from mere independence to debates over government power, competing economic visions, western expansion, slavery and treatment of Native Americans that were never fully resolved - and how the Revolution's idealism stratified into a pragmatic, crabbed, morally flawed reality that failed to erase Americans' vision of themselves as God's chosen people. The author, Dr. Gordon S. Wood is a respected historian and professor who is a very acomplished writer of early American history and this is no exception. The key events and figures of this timeframe (Washington's presidency, the Alien and Sedition Acts, Jefferson's "Revolution of 1800" and the War of 1812 among them) receive due attention, worked into a framework of a country constantly defining itself. I have been a fan of both Gordon Wood's and the Oxford History of the U.S. project for years. From the Constitution's eventual ratification to the aftermath of the War of 1812, this is an epic history of the U.S. Then chapter 18 attempts to get back to the chronology with the War of 1812. Only with the elimination of slavery could this nation that Jefferson had called “the world’s best hope” for democracy even begin to fulfill its great promise.”, Pulitzer Prize Nominee for History (2010), PROSE Award for U.S. History and Biography/Autobiography (2009), New-York Historical Society American History Book Prize, Morgan Jerkins Journeys Across the USA to Retrace Black History. But certainly I found parallels between ideas formed in the period covered by the book and the USA today. Gordon Wood is Alva O. But did you know that a lot of our founding fathers intended for the US to be a monarchy? Wood chronicles these changes with illuminating discussions of the intellectual currents of this period, how they affected the events of this period, and how, in turn, the events made plausible or implausible various intellectual currents. He received the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for History for, “Virtue became less the harsh and martial self-sacrifice of antiquity and more the modern willingness to get along with others for the sake of peace and prosperity.”, “The Civil War was the climax of a tragedy that was preordained from the time of the Revolution. This reminded me of my American history textbook. Empire of Liberty goes far beyond that structure, going as far back as the early 1700s and all the way up to the Mexican and Civil Wars to put points and stories into full context. Jefferson’s “empire of liberty.” In analyzing the paradox of slavery, Wood paints a portrait of the southern United States and the new southwestern frontier as not only out of step with the broader trends that anchor his larger in- The Empire of Liberty as conceived by Thomas Jefferson refers to America's role of spreading freedom throughout the world. The amount of research that went into this book is amazing as is the ability to condense it all into a readable format. Since it was relatively cheap to grow out my hair and act indifferent, I figured this was the best way to get girls, other than being forthright and honest and asking them on dates. It balances very well an examination of key figures - particularly Thomas Jefferson - with analysis of general trends affecting the development of US politics and society in this period (for example, the extent and character of urbanisation in the north, or the features of trade in the south). Unlike that book, Wood’s Empire of Liberty focuses on the period between the framing of the Constitution and the end of the War of 1812, often called the Early Republic Era, and largely summarizes the primary source research of other historians. Another solid entry in the Oxford History of the U.S. From the Constitution's eventual ratification to the aftermath of the War of 1812, this is an epic history of the U.S. To see what your friends thought of this book, Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789-1815, The amount of research that went into this book is amazing as is the ability to condense it all into a readable format. Whew. I was very impressed by his presentation and he even signed my copy of Empire of Liberty. We’d love your help. Historian Gordon S. Wood speaks about his book Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789-1815. There are fault lines that develop in these years as divisive and troublesome today as they were then. There's a problem loading this menu right now. Much like the other Wood book I recently read, the common theme throughout is the change all these areas underwent from an aristocratic, dependent, agrarian, Old World society into a republican, independent, commercial New World. Excellent discussions on early political parties aka Republicans vs Federalists and the rise of the middling class. Interestingly, this insight provides the backdrop for an explanation of the enigma of James Madison's alliance with Alexander Hamilton in promoting the Constitution and their rivalry once the new government was formed. The series includes three Pulitzer Prize winners, two New York Times bestsellers, and winners of the Bancroft and Parkman Prizes. It's not just a linear story of how the U.S. evolved from its new Constitutional rebirth in 1789 through the end of the War of 1812, which, he tells us, definitely broke the U.S. from its British cultural and civic roots. From our point in history it all seems so inevitable, but really, none of it was. At 700 pages plus, with an awkward trim size that made it difficult to tote around with me, nevermind hold in my hands, this book was a challenge, though one that I am glad I undertook. Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789-1815 - Ebook written by Gordon S. Wood. This reminded me of my American history textbook in my junior year. I would pretty much recommend this only to super history geeks, as it was dense. Excellent book. Took me long enough to get through this 750 page epic. Historians, in my opinion, are better when they put aside their 21st century prejudices and biases and put things into perspective that the values of society were far different in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. This one and the next are long, cover basically everything, and are pretty well paced considering how complete they are attempting to be. Undergraduates and bright high school students will find it accessible and inviting; lifelong scholars of … GORDON WOOD, author, "Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789-1815": Thank you. This book explains some of the political reasons for the war. Gordon Wood introduces this period of American history with the story of Rip Van Winkle, which is an apt illustration of the astounding cultural transformation that occurred in the period from the end of the Revolutionary War to the end of the War of 1812. This shopping feature will continue to load items when the Enter key is pressed. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally. Both approaches work, but it is a little disconcerting for the reader, as it progresses its depiction of American politics to 1800 along a fairly defined path, and then just starts approaching the years subsequent to 1800 culturally by subject matter (e.g., law, religion, westward expansion, etc. The Oxford History of the United States is by far the most respected multi volume history of our nation. A lot of us think we know about our founding fathers and what they planned for America. Although more recent histories are likelier to place more focus on these aspects, it is good to see them feature prominently in this sweeping, almost textbook-like, examination of American history between 1789 and 1815. I don't know why Mr. Wood's book didn't win the Pulitzer Prize in History, but it should have. Wood, a veteran historian on the American Revolution, spends a lot of time demarcating the differences between Federalist and Republican politicians, and how sharply (and permanently) their differing visions divided the nation's body politic. Even though the author was slightly biased towards Republicanism and very biased towards Jefferson vs the Federalist founding fathers (all you need to do is compare the adjectives he uses for Jefferson vs Washington, Adams or Hamilton), I felt that he did an excellent job of comparing the positive and negative aspects of the two dominant politcal ideologies of the era (e.g. Be the first to ask a question about Empire of Liberty. His book The Creation of the American Republic, 1776–1787 (1969) won a 1970 Bancroft Prize. Covering the American Republic's fractious early years (1789 to 1815), it's a tour de force mixture of sociological survey, political history and penetrating analysis of a country struggling to reinvent itself as an independent power. Wood lays out an excellent argument on how the Founders basically set up the US for a civil war, with the way they wrote the Constitution, namely in how they handled the slavery issue. So many history books are just summations of political and military events between two fixed dates. Only got halfway through before I had to return book to library. It doesn't justify the injustices that slaves suffered or the status of minorites, but a good author can explain the facts without asserting and thus, transferring their outrage on the reader. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. This book did not disappoint. A scholar’s work that is 1) easy to read, 2) well researched, 3) contain lots of insights, and 4) is well balanced. Covering the American Republic's fractious early years (1789 to 1815), it's a tour de force mixture of sociological survey, political history and penetrating analysis of a country struggling to reinvent itself as an independent power. There was an error retrieving your Wish Lists. That our founding fathers had very little interest in religion and one of the most popular books written during this period was an anti-religious tome? Now, in the newest volume in the series, one of America's most esteemed historians, Gordon S. Wood, offers a brilliant account of the early American Republic, ranging from 1789 and the beginning of the … Please try again. The Creation of the American Republic 1776-1787, , que l'on peut trouver en français à un prix prohibitif, La création de la République américaine, 1776-1787, ) c'est la deuxième option qui est choisie - celle que Jean Claude Michéa appelle. Empire of Liberty is a gripping narrative on the first 25+ years of the United States of America, the story of how the founding fathers started the nation, how the country saw itself, and how the nation was defined through constant- sometimes suffocating -contradictions. You know you have a problem when you have a favorite author about Revolutionary and Colonial American history. Empire of Liberty is the title of Gordon Wood’s magisterial new history of the early American republic, 1789 to 1815: boom and transformation on our shores, the rise and fall of Napoleon in the wider world. At 738 pages (paperback)this is a balanced to "center-left" history book, which is a little different than what I am used to but it was well done. "Empire of Liberty," Jefferson's phrase, is also a neat capsule of the contradiction between a republic of free and equal mostly rural yeomen and a hegemonic global idea wrapped into … Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 6, 2018. We can go to Plymouth!!! If only more academics writing big histories could write this well for the layman ( I am also half way through professor Greengrass's 'Christendom Destroyed' and have had to pause it there, as it is one of the most difficult history books that I have read). Gordon Wood talked about his book [Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789-1815] (Oxford University Press, USA, 2009). So I can definitly put this one down as my "accomplishment" book of the year. The first 8 chapters seem to be linear and chronological from the 1787 Constitutional Convention to 1800, but in chapter 9 after reaching Jefferson’s election of 1800, the author hits reverse and goes back to cover specific topics of the 1790s. Plus I found it dry reading, but again just my opinion. "Empire of Liberty will rightly take its place among the authoritative volumes in this important and influential series. I am just about half way through and have found it a joy to read. Gordon Wood introduces this period of American history with the story of Rip Van Winkle, which is an apt illustration of the astounding cultural transformation that occurred in the period from the end of the Revolutionary War to the end of the War of 1812. Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789-1815 $ 19.95 Gordon S. Wood offers a brilliant account of the early American Republic ranging from 1789 and the beginning of the national government to the end of the War of 1812. That our founding fathers had very little. I am in love with the Oxford US history series. Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789-1815. by Gordon Wood, Oxford University Press. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. A lot of us think we know about our founding fathers and what they planned for America. The Oxford History of the United States is by far the most respected multi-volume history of our nation.